Early Career Researchers

Dr Dale Robinson

Dr Dale Robinson is a postdoctorate research fellow in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Melbourne. He has a background in Mechanical Engineering and worked as an analyst for Boeing Aerostructures Australia, before obtaining his PhD in Biomechanical Engineering at the University of Melbourne (2016). Dr Robinson’s research is focused on disorders of the musculoskeletal system and has made contributions in the experimental analysis and computational modelling of the spine, shoulder, transfemoral osseointegration and 3D-printed medical implants. Dr Robinson is thrilled to be part of the ARC CMIT project and looks forward to working with associated partners in developing new platform technologies for personalised medical devices.

Dr Martina Barzan

Dr Martina Barzan is a postdoctoral research fellow with experience in paediatric orthopaedic biomechanics. She is currently working at the Griffith Centre of Biomedical and Rehabilitation Engineering (Griffith University), developing personalised digital twins of children with hip deformities. In collaboration with several orthopaedic surgeons at the Queensland Children's Hospital and medical device companies, Dr Barzan uses the digital twins to inform virtual surgery planning and design personalised surgical guides. In 2019 she completed a PhD on the development of personalised knee kinematic models of children with recurrent patellar dislocation at Griffith University. Previous to this, she graduated in Bioengineering at the University of Padova (Italy). Dr Barzan is thrilled to be part of the ARC CMIT project and looks forward to playing a role in helping children through personalised implants and innovative surgical solutions.

Dr Hans Gray

Dr Hans Gray is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Melbourne. His first degree was in Mechanical Engineering following which he worked as an engineer in a manufacturing industry. He completed his doctorate at the University of Oxford where he developed and experimentally validated a finite element model of the human tibia which he used to investigate in vivo tissue remodelling that follows knee replacement surgery. Subsequently he broadened the scope of his research to include experimental human motion biomechanics and modelling of the human musculoskeletal system. Dr Gray is delighted to be part of the ARC CMIT team and looks forward to working with industry partners and clinicians to address some of the challenges in biomechanics, particularly in the areas of transfemoral osseointegrated implants and personalised orthopaedic devices.